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FUTURESPECTIVE: JOHNNY ROBLES

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SOME FUTURESPECTIVE: 
JOHNNY ROBLES 
Johnny Robles is exhibiting in the upcoming group show "FUTURESPECTIVE" - Opening: Thursday, Feb. 14th 2013
ROBLES THOUGHTS ON FUTURESPECTIVE 
I'm excited to show with artists whose work I like. I'm gonna be showing these new "floater" pieces. I'm in the first stages of this body of work. They're bubble like forms made from acrylic and maple wood...It's the idea of a form that's changing, like glass taking shape where what would be behind it is absent, bending the laws of nature. The idea is derived from the floaters that everyone sees on the outer shell of their eye, that constantly changing transparent shape, usually worm-like. I'm making them 3 dimensional, and trying to capture the organic shape of a soap bubble at the same time."
"I like the negative space and embracing the minimal quality, even though it's a complex form that's very carefully made. It's an exploration that's still unfolding. I work backwards. I build the frame and then I think of what's going to go in it. I build a boundary, then go into the playground and get loose." 
FUTURESPECTIVE 

George Sanchez-Calderon
Christopher Carter
Nicola Costantino
Johnny Robles
Kiki Valdes
Jel Martinez
Constanza Piaggio 
David Marsh
JeanPaul Mallozzi
Ruben Ubiera
Florencia Rodríguez Giles

Presented by: 
The Rozenblum Foundation
The Michael Margulies Artist Agency 


Curator: Kiki Valdes


8:00pm - 11:00pm


ARTE CITY BUILDING 
2155 Washington Court Suite 109
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Behind Bass Museum) 


More Info: MarguliesAgency.com
Info@MarguliesAgency.com
305.972.8962
Opening: Thursday, Feb. 14th 2013
Words/Images via: New Times 

FUTURESPECTIVE - Opens Thursday!

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Add some text, Yo! Click this text box to change the text, style, color and fonts.

FUTURESPECTIVE: DAVID MARSH

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SOME FUTURESPECTIVE:
DAVID MARSH 

You experiment with layers, materials and techniques. Do you need the freedom to experiment or do you need various techniques to express who you are as an artist?


Both. These are not separate concepts in my work. They go hand-in-hand and support each other.


What are your latest interests in terms of techniques and subject matter?


Sewing is an element I’ve recently started using. It used to be something where I just did it to see what happens and now I sew a lot. My subject matter is the same as it ever was---it’s just material, shape and design.


Where do you see your art going?


I can’t predict where my art will go because I am always changing my work and challenging myself.


Does Miami inspire you?


Yes—it’s beautiful here. I’m not too inspired by the art scene as a whole, but I’m positive about what goes on within it. The atmosphere outside is more inspirational to me—for example, some of my paintings incorporate sports jerseys. I was inspired to do this out of being able to exercise and be active with my friends. Being around here keeps me in that mood.


You are part of the upcoming group show “Futurespective.” Can you tell us more about the exhibit?


I believe in the group of artists that were chosen to be a part of this show. I believe they are all great artists.


DAVID MARSH IS IN THE NEW GROUP EXHIBIT "FUTURESPECTIVE" OPENING FEB. 14TH 
Excerpts from interview for Miami Art Zine. Words by Heike Dempster
Opening: Thursday, Feb. 14th 2013
Presented by:
The Rozenblum Foundation
The Michael Margulies Artist Agency

Curator: Kiki Valdes


8:00pm - 11:00pm


ARTE CITY BUILDING
2155 Washington Court Suite 109
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Behind Bass Museum)


More Info: MarguliesAgency.com
Info@MarguliesAgency.com
305.972.8962
Works by:
George Sanchez-Calderon
Christopher Carter
Nicola Costantino
Johnny Robles
Kiki Valdes
Jel Martinez
Constanza Piaggio
David Marsh
JeanPaul Mallozzi
Ruben Ubiera
Florencia Rodríguez Giles
FUTURESPECTIVE




       

FUTURESPECTIVE: RUBEN UBIERA

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SOME FUTURESPECTIVE:
RUBEN
 

UBIERA
Interview excerpts from Wonderland Magazine. 
"FUTURESPECTIVE"
 Opening: Thursday, Feb. 14th 2013

You are part of the upcoming group show “Futurespective.” What can you already tell us about the show and your work in it?


I think it’s something very different than what people are used to see. I know a lot of the artists in the show and have worked with some in the past. Most of them are locals, all talented. I believe people will be arrested by the element of surprise behind every corner.


You incorporate found objects such as wood, newspapers and old skateboards. Can you elaborate on why you use objects and make them part of your art?



Yes. I do incorporate all sort of objects and re-claimed wood found on the streets. It is after all our environment. I try to get objects that are unusual, items you rarely see, work with them and assemble a balanced composition with them until something starts to take shape. I find that people relate to these items, which make an initial connection, but then, I change their perspective by creating something completely different and unexpected on top of each ensemble. It has become a true definition of “one ugly item by itself, it’s just ugly – one hundred ugly items, organized and systematically planned, become beautiful.”



You are from the Dominican Republic. How does your heritage inform your art?



In almost every way. First off: color. My island has a lot of color and folklore. I try using my folklore to focus on my heritage, and hide it within my work. I don’t like to scream my origin, but if someone happens to see a symbol or a Dominican item like the “Limping Devil,” guira or drums, then great! If not, no big deal. But the reality is that a lot of ideas I have, have been brewing ever since I was a child in that small island in the Caribbean. I just now posses the tools to do it. My nationality does not dictate my art, but it shapes it. ---- Keep reading this interview right here

Works by:

George Sanchez-Calderon
Christopher Carter
Nicola Costantino
Johnny Robles
Kiki Valdes
Jel Martinez
Constanza Piaggio
David Marsh
JeanPaul Mallozzi
Ruben Ubiera
Florencia Rodríguez Giles


Presented by:
The Rozenblum Foundation
The Michael Margulies Artist Agency

Curator: Kiki Valdes


8:00pm - 11:00pm


ARTE CITY BUILDING
2155 Washington Court Suite 109
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Across from Bass Museum)


More Info: MarguliesAgency.com
Info@MarguliesAgency.com
305.972.8962

FUTURESPECTIVE: NICOLA COSTANTINO

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Nicola Costantino was born in Rosario (1964) where she studied Fine Arts, produced and exhibited her first works, and also learned the new sculpture techniques that influenced the concept of her production; the molds of human and animal bodies cast from the original that characterize her work.

In 1994 with the support of Pablo Suárez, she attended the Barracas Workshop of Antorchas Foundation coordinated by Suárez and Benedit. Shortly after moving to Buenos Aires, she spent a year in Houston, Texas, in the Core Program for Artists, where she began producing silicon human skin to make dresses and lavish coats with human hair necks. Nicola learned design and haute couture in her adolescence working with her mother in her clothes factory, which allowed her to create “Peletería humana” [Human Furriery] a work of the finest quality.

Since 1997, the support of Benzacar Gallery facilitated her inclusion in the international art scene through her participation in art fairs. The following year, she presented her “Chanchobolas” [Hog-balls], an emblematic work from the animal sculpture line that she would continue with


NICOLA COSTANTINO
One of the artists featured in FUTURESPECTIVE
Group show opens Feb. 14th 

  (Biography continues below video.)
Friso de nonatos” [Frieze of Unborn Animals] in 1999 and “Animal Motion Planet” in 2004.

“Peletería Humana”, a window display with twenty mannequins dressed in Nicola’s designs, represented Argentina at the Biennial of Sao Paulo in 1998, whose director was Pablo Herkenhoff, and the theme “anthropophagy and cannibalism”.  This presentation led to several exhibitions and international biennials, and the reproduction of her work a number of catalogs. The display was also shown in the First Liverpool Biennial and Jeffrey Deitch invited her to turn his Soho gallery into a boutique in September 2000. At the same time, the selection committee of the MOMA became aware of Nicola’s work and added her “Male Nipples Corset” to their collection. This was followed by a show at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Buenos Aires [Buenos Aires National Museum of Fine Arts] and a second one in the projects room of The Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona.

In 2004, Nicola presented “Animal Motion Planet”, a series of orthopedic machines for unborn animals, consisting of chromed iron mechanisms powered by engines, and she launched “Savon de Corps” [Body Soap] at the MALBA [Buenos Aires Museum of Latin American Art], which is formed by a multiple of 100 pieces imitating an exclusive cosmetic product. Nicola produced this soap with 3% of fat from a liposuction and created the slogan “Take a bath with me” that attracted media attention. Nicola became the artist, the model and the prime matter of her work.

From then on, Nicola’s public relevance gave sense to her later production. The encounter with Gabriel Valansi in 2006 marked her entrance in the world of photography. In her work, she has combined two types of images: a series that refers to important works in the history of photography and art, and others that crisscross some element of her imaginary and her identity as an artist. The constant is her role as leading character representing different personalities, glamorous and feminine, hard worker, maternal, intimidating. In this last production, marked by her maternity, she adds the value of her experience a
     
FUTURESPECTIVE
 Opening: Thursday, Feb. 14th 2013


Works by:
George Sanchez-Calderon
Christopher Carter
Nicola Costantino
Johnny Robles
Kiki Valdes
Jel Martinez
Constanza Piaggio
David Marsh
JeanPaul Mallozzi
Ruben Ubiera
Florencia Rodríguez Giles
Presented by:
The Rozenblum Foundation
The Michael Margulies Artist Agency

Curator: Kiki Valdes


8:00pm - 11:00pm


ARTE CITY BUILDING
2155 Washington Court Suite 109
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Across from Bass Museum)


More Info: MarguliesAgency.com
Info@MarguliesAgency.com
305.972.8962





   

THE ADVANTAGE OF VINTAGE REPRO

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THE ADVANTAGE OF VINTAGE
REPRO

PEARL
AND
EARL

Pearl and Earl can be found most days at REMIX on Beverly Blvd Los Angeles. REMIX is a hidden treasure dedicated to the faithful reproduction of the vintage shoe. And girls, we all know what that means. VINTAGE SHOES IN OUR SIZE! I have small to average feet coming in at a 7.5 US size, 38 euro, and in my many years of trawling through vintage goods, I have only found ONE PAIR that fit. But now thanks to owner Philip Heath, those usually tiny, impeccable pumps are available to all. Here's a selection of my favorite styles for more visit www.remixvintageshoes.com
REMIX is filled with large vintage posters of pin up girls. There's a charming eclectic vibe, and Pearl makes you feel right at home.

I love me some
ORIGINAL vintage but sometimes it's just not available. These shoes are well made, unusual, and give a certain spark of individuality to any look. So of course I had to buy a pair.

Ok two pairs.
Ok THREE!
But who's counting?

FLEA MARKET STYLE

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STYLE
JOHNNY RAMIREZ - RAMIREZ I TRAN
Johnny is an old friend, the most stylish man I know, and soley responsible for the color of my hair. Jonny is a mad genius with a fashionista client list and a flair for all things beautiful . The BEST colorist in LA / NY / Miami, Johnny is opening a new salon with his partner ANH CO TRAN, another crazy talent, who just happens to be responsible for my cut. Check them out. http://ramireztran.com/
These are the lovely folks of the flea market. I find that creative places attract creative people, and god am I grateful. It's surprisingly hard to find people with individual style, which makes me wonder... Is fashion fading fast? Are we all too tired, or too busy to make the effort on a day to day basis? Or maybe we just aren't brave enough to dress the way we feel. Truth be told my closet is full of beautiful, crazy things that never get worn and I certainly find myself too busy to try. Sometimes playing it safe seems easier, but I know this: 
1. I want to remeber my life as being fun, and experimental.
2. I adore fashion and I want to be a part of it. 
3. Every child deserves to laugh at the way their parents used to dress. 
SO. Let's make a deal. I'll be me, you be you, and the world will be a much more colorful place. And if anyone feels like judging, screw em.
JOHHNY
ZIP STEVENSON
THANK YOU FOR STOPPING! If you were kind enough to stop, but didn't end up on my blog, you have AMAZING STYLE but I am a TERRIBLE PHOTOGRAPHER and for whatever reason I botched up your pic. But thank you kindly for stopping, and please keep dressing like a baller. The world appreciates it.

FUTURESPECTIVE - PRESS RELEASE

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FUTURESPECTIVE

 

The Rozenblum Foundation and the Michael Margulies Artist Agency Present the Group Show “Futurespective,” Curated by Kiki Valdes

MIAMI

- February 4, 2013 - The Michael Margulies Artist Agency and Kiki Valdes announce "Futurespective," a group installation focused on the exciting times in Miami's art scene. From striving local talent to a growing impact on the international art conversation, “Futurespective” encapsulates Miami's new era while highlighting significant developments in the city. The forward-thinking, emerging and mid-career artists showcased in “Futurespective” offer new, artistic perspectives by experimenting with contemporary media and exploring different themes to encourage new discourse.

























Each member of the group interprets the theme individually, such as Christopher Carter’s heavy, powerful sculptures with deep roots in history or David Marsh's abstract, visual paintings with layers, materials, techniques and the place of the painter himself. George Sanchez-Calderon’s large-scale projects engage in the modern condition while JeanPaul Mallozzi adds his distinct paintings of emotional observation. Jel Martinez puts an urban spin on art -- going beyond graffiti with explorations of erasure, removal and texture.

The group show features works by local artists Christopher Carter, David Marsh, George Sanchez-Calderon, JeanPaul Mallozzi, Jel Martinez, Johnny Robles, Kiki Valdes and Ruben Ubiera as well as Argentine artists Nichola Constantino, Constanza Piaggio and Florencia Rodriguez Giles. Each one differs in practice; however, all share a forward-driven vision based on a pattern of new discoveries in the Miami art landscape. Curator and artist Kiki Valdes' close connection to each member of the group allows Valdes to mix and match the works, “like a jigsaw puzzle,” until the vision of “Futurespective” comes to life.

Johnny Robles’ work ranges from murals to the juxtaposition of delicate black and white renderings with bright colors and site-specific installations. Kiki Valdes’ expressionist paintings explore the multi-dimensional complexities of people, religion, American-life, sex, and superstition. Ruben Ubiera’s Post-Grafism, centered on urban life and the Diaspora culture of the city via installation and mixed media, adds to Miami’s present and future representation. Nicola Constantino, Constanza Piaggio and Florencia Rodriguez Giles add views from behind the lens. Constantino’s photography explores female identity and questions the ambivalent codes of conduct in modern society. Piaggio uses visual language to transcend barriers and explore the unknown while Rodriguez Giles examines transcultural themes such as spirituality.


The “Futurespective” opening reception will be held on Thursday, February 4th and run through Thursday, February 28th at the Arte City Building in Miami Beach.


Opening Reception - Thursday, February 14, 8 -11 pm

Closing Reception - Thursday, February 28, 8 - 11 pm

For more information on “Futurespective,” the artists, or upcoming events visit:

www.marguliesagency.com or call 305.972.8962.

  DAVID MARSH 
CHRISTOPHER CARTER 
 NICOLA COSTANTINO
GEORGE SANCHEZ-CALDERON 
  KIKI VALDES
RUBEN UBIERA 

FUTURESPECT - FEB. 14 - 2013

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FUTURESPECTIVE ARTIST - JEL MARTINEZ

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"FUTURESPECTIVE" - Opening: Thursday, Feb.  14th 2013
Works by: George Sanchez-Calderon, Christopher Carter, Nicola Costantino, Johnny Robles, Kiki Valdes, Jel Martinez, Constanza Piaggio, David Marsh, JeanPaul Mallozzi, Ruben Ubiera, Florencia Rodríguez Giles

You make your work by buffing and removing the surface texture of graffiti. What first interested you in graffiti removal?


I was really introduced to the removal in 1994 when the Summit Of The Americas was held in Miami, Florida. The streets of Miami were completely cleaned up and the buff [the mark left behind when graffiti is scraped and 'buffed' off walls] was everywhere. That was a drastic moment for me! I then continued to piece and continued to get buffed until 1998. The buff has always been a part of my world but in 2008 I decided to recreate a part of history, a part of my life, which is recreating the removals that surround us and go unnoticed.


Could you tell us more?


My work first starts from documenting the removals through photographs I capture in the streets. I then become 3 different characters, the construction worker who creates the wall, the vandal who defaces the property and the city employee who removes the graffiti. My work consists of multiple layers which are a reenactment of what is happening in our surroundings and all have a story and memory behind it. I try to give the viewer the opportunity to visualize and understand a movement that previously went untold and unnoticed by the general public.


There is an increase in street art presence in the fine arts and more shows about graffiti and urban art. What has changed?


I feel that the whole graffiti world has changed. It was an underground movement then but now it is accepted not only in galleries but also in the streets. It was very different in the 80's and 1990's.

SOME FUTURESPECTIVE:
  JEL MARTINEZ
Add some text, Yo! Click this text box to change the text, style, color and fonts.
Interview by: Heiki Dempster for Wonderland Magazine 
FUTURESPECTIVE

Presented by:
The Rozenblum Foundation
The Michael Margulies Artist Agency

Curator: Kiki Valdes

Thursday, Feb 14th
8:00pm - 11:00pm


ARTE CITY BUILDING
2155 Washington Court
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Across from Bass Museum)

More Info: MarguliesAgency.com
Info@MarguliesAgency.com
305.972.8962
Christopher Carter - "Texas Two Star (Neon"
To keep reading this interview click here. 

Real-Life Super Hero

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HEROES COMPASSION FOR THE KIDS. 
These are real men/real-life heroes right here. These are window washers at a children's hospital in Pittsburgh. If this doesn't touch your heart I don't know what will. If you want to know more check out.   I Am an Engineer to Change the Worldwww.letsdochange.com 

WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO THE HAT?

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What ever happened to the hat?
MONTEZ AND
MELBA
THE HAT is more than missing from our generation. Sported, tipped or shed, there was once a time when a hat could speak a thousand words and now, we barely even speak the same language. In a world of LOL's and OMG's, have we gained so much fashion freedom, that we've forgotten how to dress? Milliner Montez Murphy hopes otherwise. And so do I.
This is MONTEZ MURPHY. Montez owns THE MILLINERY GUILD on Beverly Blvd in Los Angeles. Montez is a real character. I met her in the LA fashion district while stalking stylish folk for my blog, and before I even knew her name, she had invited me to shoot her store. Gosh am I glad that I did. There are times in your life when you meet truly special, unique people, and Montez is one of them. She is an artist. Gentle and passionate, her hats tell her story, and she's more than willing to share a few gems herself.

As I snapped my way around the store, one particular piece caught my attention. A purple hat in the shape of a 20's haircut. Montez told me she had made the hat after she lost her hair to cancer. A cancer that eventually lead to a heart transplant, as a result of chemotherapy. To see her today, a force to be reckoned with, you get a sense of the kind of woman she is. I can't see this fire cracker taking anything lying down, especially not the big C.

Montez has the patience of a saint. Answering all my questions, explaining her methods, showing me her work space and letting me rearrange her displays. She gives me artistic freedom, nothing is off limits, and she humors my need to try on EVERYTHING. At one point she asked me if I new Mondo. Anyone who watches project runway knows exactly who that is. It turns out that Mondo and Montez go back a long way, he is a regular customer, but more so, a friend. That's just who Montez is. She's magnetic. Creative people are drawn to her, and she is perfectly happy to give them her time.




The Millinery Guild
7767 Beverly Blvd . Los Angeles . CA . 90036
Tel: 213 985 4784
www.themillineryguild.com
themillineryguild@gmail.com
  www.chapeaudujour.blogspot.com

THE MILLINERY GUILD
The Millinery Guild has all the makings of an art gallery. Clean lines and pure walls. The hats, mostly created by Montez herself, some by HOUSE OF NINES, are artfully displayed and reasonably priced between $80 and $150 dollars, which is especially delicious when you discover they've been worn by the likes of Viola Davis and Dita Von Teese. Montez also offers a custom service for the more particular patron.

 
 BRING BACK THE HAT
The hat truly offers something no other piece of clothing can. Communication. Tossed in joy, shed in respect, or simply just tilted as a charming hello, the hat was a form of social connection long before the days of Twitter or Facebook. In a time where social graces are fading fast, I say we make strides to bring back the hat,
and hopefully the everyday pleasantries the hat once stood for, will follow closely behind.  

VIVA VIRGO

Posted by indiadebeaufort Views: 6,177
VIRGO
Downtown Los Angeles
A vibrant little store in downtown LA. Retro pieces are revamped and given new life in this local spot, owned by the creator of the imaginative goods. If you're looking for an item that is guaranteed to be a one off, this might just be your new haunt . Neatly cushioned in the heart of the fashion district, Virgo caters to the men and women of a bolder generation. These clothes make a statement. They simply scream fun.
CHeck out the websitE
here

IS IT WEIRD IF I TAKE YOUR PICTURE?

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IS IT WEIRD IF I TAKE YOUR PICTURE?
I took a trip downtown to stalk my fellow folk.
Dilemma. Do I just get em', or is it slightly unseemly to chase people around with a camera? And so I began the awkward "Hiiii, I have a blog, can I???

Apparently you make friends quickly this way.

Let me introduce you to the women of the fashion district.

When I started my day I got into my car and made a trip I have made many times. I arrived in the LA Fashion District, parked my car in the same place I always park, and headed to Michael Levine, a reasonably priced spot for everything you could possibly need. I did come for fabric, lord knows I can't enter any kind of haberdashery and leave empty handed, but I really came to find some stylish folk. Armed with my Cannon T3i I slowly made my way around the store, more present than I've been in a while, assessing every shopper, waiting for the anti cookie-cutter customer. There she is! I found my first victim. But what to do now? I usually keep to myself in this environment, get what I need and get out, and in a funny way breaking the communication barrier was incredibly liberating. After the first " You have great style, may I????" it only got easier. Before I knew it I was swapping details, having a good old natter and making friends. How incredible! It was like a whole new world, and I loved it. I have a feeling fabric shopping will never be the same. Aren't these girls fab!?


The lovely lady on the far right, tunic and head scarf is Claire Oswalt. She is the co-founder of HOPEWELL . A company that creates Artisan bedding. The spirit of her studio stems from the Hopwellian Exchange System, a Native American trade route through which materials from far and wide are received, turned into handmade products, and traded.  Check out her website HERE

"We lost HOW MANY MODELS!??"

Posted by indiadebeaufort Views: 6,289

Fashion is a life line. Fashion is a statement of self. Fashion is Art. My love of fashion is wrapped up in fantasy and imagination, but my first plunge down the rabbit hole, into the inner workings was a real shock to the system. Anyone can have an Idea,  but getting it to walk down the runway is something else entirely. It's bloody hard work. And that's just dealing with the models. Or rather trying to make sense of why they didn't  show up...

It all began at NYFW in the spring of 2012. I managed to wrangle my way into a few shows at the tents, thanks to my lovely publicist Jane, and I took some of my own pieces to wear. One of the perks of NYFW for an actor, is that you get to wear the designers clothes if they invite you to sit front row at their show. Pinch me. Of course you have to give them back the next day, unless the designer is Nannette Lepore, an angel sent down from the fashion heavens, but that's another story.

 

While I was in town, I went to the EMERGE! show, an event supporting up and coming designers, Andre Leon Talley was in attendance, as was my mum, and a few hundred industry faces. I wore my own design, a dramatic tulle skirt, and patterned coat, which now looking back was not my finest hour, but it did the trick.

 

A few months go by. The phone rings. It's Jane, my aforementioned lovely publicist. Apparently EMERGE! remembered my ensemble, heard it was my own and asked me to come back, this time with a few more. An entire collection.

 

And that's when I said it. YES.

.

 

MY STUDIO

I sketched. I shopped for fabric. I sketched. I shopped for more fabric. I fell in love with each yard. And then I'd throw it out. I draped, I constructed, I hand sewed, machine sewed,  and then I unpicked the stitches. It took me and my Bernina two months to design and make 15 pieces that made up 10 looks. My good friend Tatiana helped me finish many of the pieces, her skill far superior to mine, and her patience unrivaled.

 

I worked every day from 8am to 8pm. My mum came to stay with me to keep me fed and watered and to make sure I set down tools at an appropriate hour. She also kept the Tivo stocked with the Golden Girls. Life Saver.

 

 

 

 

 

Somewhere in the middle of the madness I was making the yellow coat in the picture above. The fabric is pure silk, temperamental and delicate. The smallest droplet of water would have been a catastrophe, so you can imagine how distraught I was to find a black greasy foot print smack bam in the middle of the skirt. I remember, crazed and unkempt, frantically demanding to see the bottom of everyones shoes...

 

After a tiny meltdown my embarrassment was piqued and my apologies many. Where would we be without unconditional love.

 

The coat you see above used to be fuller and floor length. Divine intervention?

 

Gosh it was satisfying each time a piece was finished, A mini celebration. A step closer. It was entirely creative, and consuming, and fantastic. It was hard, but it was an invaluable education.

We lost HOW MANY MODELS?!?

My 1st time showing at NYFW

My mum, my boyfriends mum and me, off to see Nanette Lepores spring collection. Nanette is lovely. She was kind to my mum, she personally handled my fitting, and it was BY FAR my favorite look of the week. I was giddy when I found out I could keep it. It's still one of my most prized pieces.

THE TENTS

Its incredible. It's a moving breathing thing. The brave make bold colorful statements, the chic make accessorizing an art form, and the bloggers push and shove to get the best shot of it all. And that's just outside. Inside, backstage, it's vibrant. A well oiled machine building to the long awaited moment when the lights go down and the music goes up.

I'd love to say that the rumors are false. That there is kindness and equality in fashion, but Its a who's who inside the tents. You are a number, a value, and you're made to feel it. You wear your seat allocation like a badge of honor. There were often times when my mum and I were pushed aside or forgotten. The poor behavior of one young reality star comes to mind. My mum and I have a Liverpool meets London way about us. Tough, secure, and able to laugh. Perhaps if the aforementioned young starlet were a little more humorous, she'd have been a little more well mannered.

 

The show itself is like the eye of the storm. Everyone is silent. Thoughtful. The second the designer leaves the stage, it's bags up, cameras out, and a mad dash for the door before the next show moves in. Every show I saw was inspiring, some more than others, but I saw it all differently this time. The last time I came to fashion  week I oooh'd and ahhh'd at the pieces I loved, and nodded along to the music, happily enjoying the full experience. Now that I had made my own collection, I took note of every shoe, how many different kinds of shoe they used, the music, the styling, the make up choice, the number of models, the type of model... I was breaking it all down, rather than seeing the whole picture. I had a new understanding of the reality of it all. I also couldn't help but wonder if I was way out of my depth.

THE CASTING

 

Prior to arriving in NY I had arranged to borrow shoes from a designer, we discovered they didn't have the stock last minute, so my mum and I spent the week shopping between shows. The day of the casting, we crammed 10 pairs of boots, sewing tools, accessories, and my entire collection into a mini van. We drove to lower Manhattan to cast and fit the girls. A good friend, one of the best seamstresses in the business, had flown in from London for three days just to help me out. Thank you CC.

 

 

 

It was two days before the show. We were crammed into a tiny NY studio, and there were a hundred or so girls in a line down the hall. As an actor this was a fascinating experience. I knew exactly how they felt, and it was odd to be the one on the other side of it. One by one they came in, I knew instantly which girls fit with my aesthetic and which didn't. All I could do was pray they could walk. I ended up casting 8 girls, some green, some experienced, all very sweet and kind.

 

We fit them there and then. The boots were the wrong size. Some of the girls needed wigs. We spent the next two days altering the clothes, buying new boots, new wigs, AND going to shows. I now know the layout of every TJ Maxx in Manhattan.

THE SHOW

Its been months in the making, my hands are shredded. CC has spent the last two days altering, morning and night, jet lagged and exhausted. My mum has been a saint. Jane has worked her butt off, and my boyfriend and his mum have been a tremendous support. We are tired. But we are here. And ready to kick some arse.

My mum has been in the entertainment industry her entire life, in front of and behind the camera. She knows how to pull it together, and as a team we all go to work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noon We set up our space back stage. A safe spot for the girls to change, and for us to make last minute adjustments. A few girls arrive and go straight into hair and make up. I give the team images of the looks I'd like, I give them the wigs to style and I leave them to it.

1pm We begin setting up the dress rehearsal. I had shot some images of alleyways that I wanted to use as a back drop and I had cut together some music for sound, and created a logo on Photoshop. I'm just starting out, so I did what I could by myself. Most designers hire someone to handle it. And there's a reason for that. My logo wouldn't work and the music wouldn't play. First crisis. The team at EMERGE! worked tirelessly to help. They were wonderful.

2pm I realize we still only have a few girls. CC is doing some last minute alterations, I am running around like a mad hatter.

3pm I find out one of the girls won't be coming. And then another. And then another. Panic mode. The clothes are tailored to the models we cast. The show is in three hours. Emerge! find me a couple of girls on the spot, we fit them, and alterations begin that had previously taken two days. Its safe to say I am only just about holding it together.

3:30pm The wigs are ruined. The hair team have incorrectly glued the lace wigs to the girls hair. We have to remove the wigs, cut the lace, and remove as much glue as possible. One of the wigs doesn't make it. Luckily it's a wig that would have been used on the first girl that didn't show. I want to be clear about the hair team - they were the kindest most hard working people, they were mortified and they tried so so hard to help me, and I only mention this hiccup to give you a full idea of the workings of the day. Lace wigs are a complicated thing to handle, and not something every stylist is taught to use.

4pm The last girl to arrive isn't coming. Breakdown. It's the strangest feeling. I remember thinking " I really don't know how my body is going to react to this". Its like a wave passes over you and you lose awareness for a few seconds. I slowly walk to our backstage area, completely dazed, CC is fitting another girl who needs to have her entire outfit altered in two hours, and I face the corner, embarrassed, and my face starts leaking. Literally can't hold back the tears.

The shoes. New models. New Feet. New shoes. Frantic phone calls ensue. My boyfriend and my publicist quickly dash out to TJ Maxx AGAIN. A store we have all come to know too well.

4:05pm We now have four new models, to replace the four we lost. Someone sticks their head around the corner of the door and says "dress run 5 minutes". We rally. Music starts working. Backdrop is working. Hair and make up is done. We get the girls changed and we get out there. Wait. Where is J? The first girl that's supposed to walk is gone. The building is searched. Her name is announced on the loud speakers. She's not in the restroom. She's gone. 5 minutes go by. 10. 15. 30 minutes go by, and she walks through the front door. I grab her hand so fast and rush her backstage and the rehearsal begins. I never even asked where she was. The girls go down the runway pinned into the clothes, some bare foot, some not even dressed.

During this time I hear some of the other designers abruptly instructing their models, there is a line for them. Me designer. You model. A line we didn't have. My mum and I bought our girls lunch and coffee. Made sure they had a place to change without the male models seeing them undress. We've been in their shoes, we know how it feels. That's the only part that makes me sad. When the girls didn't show, it kinda hurt. We had gotten along great at the casting, we treated them well, which is sadly not the norm, and to have them not show, some of them not even call, was saddening. Even more saddening was the behavior of one or two girls on the day. They wouldn't wear make up, they complained about having to walk up stairs, they wouldn't carry a bag down the runway.  When I am hired to do a job, I do my job. I have worked in 40 degree temperatures, in the rain, in a pair of leather hot pants. I have walked in heels, feet blistered, vomited during a work day and kept going. I know professionalism, and this was far from it. Most of the girls were an absolute dream. No complaints, worked hard and stayed late to do press. Did whatever they could to help. And to those girls I am truly thankful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6pm By some miracle the girls are clothed. The clothes fit. The shoes fit. The wigs are on and the make up is touched up. We did it. The crowds arrive and my friends are seated. I do a last minute make-up fix, throw on my own dress, and boots (which are too big because I gave my boots to one of the models) and I give a last minute "be fierce" speech to my girls. The lights go down, the music goes up, and my first collection walks out onto the runway at New York Fashion Week. One by one the girls go out, and finally I join them. A wave of emotion hits me as I step onto the runway but I push it back down. Its time to be a pro. Light bulb. Flash. Flash. Applause. Its over.

 

I slept for two weeks straight. It was momentous. It was life changing. It was soul lifting and soul destroying all at the same time. When I watch the video back I start to think that I should have have done things differently. I should have made different clothes, simpler clothes, I should have cued the girls differently, maybe changed the music, and then I think, no. It was a moment in time. I did what I did. And I'm proud of it.

 

 

Enjoy.


Backstage my friend, Fashion desinger Ann Yee came to support

My mum does it all.

Mad: What People Said at Obama Inaugural

Posted by Wildcats Views: 8,199

Yesterday was the Inaugural celebration and public swearing-in for President Obama’s second term! And while it’s historic and all that, not everyone could be there (if we’re going to stand out in the cold, we expect to get an Apple product or see the back of Matt Lauer’s head in person — and, ideally, both!). However, being the solid Americans that we are, we thought we’d pass along some of the highlights:

No great story starts with a salad.

Posted by Wildcats Views: 11,770

ALCOHOL:

Because no great story

starts with a salad.

You Can Love Your Country

Posted by HorrorBBQ Views: 5,618

Inauguration of 1913

Posted by HorrorBBQ Views: 7,424

March 4, 1913. "Inauguration of Woodrow Wilson as 28th President of the United States." 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection.

The Inauguration: 1913

Via: Shorpy

Good Grief

Posted by HorrorBBQ Views: 7,135

I'm trapped in this $@#% box...and it's called a blog entry.